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Jarrod Birmingham on #TTRMS | Wednesday, April 12th!

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SHINER, TX — Jarrod Birmingham will be our guest Wednesday, April 12, 2017, on the Texas Thunder Radio Music Showcase, Live from TKO’s Bar-Grill-Music located in the Historic William Green Building, at 103 E 7th in Shiner!
Doors open at four, and the Texas Thunder Radio Music Showcase begins at 8 pm. There is no charge to attend and all ages are welcome.

Jarrod Birmingham

Jarrod Birmingham

April 12th – 8:00pm

Connect: @Jarrod_B_Music

He has been compared to Waylon Jennings and Hank Williams, Jr., producer Eric Paul described the country traditionalist as “the first real singer of the 21st century.” Humbled by the accolades, Birmingham attributes his pure and gritty musical style to his true grit lifestyle.

This South Texas native is no manufactured “hat act.” Birmingham is a REAL cowboy. A former professional bull rider who has enough pins, plates, and screws in his body to make it difficult to pass an airport scanner, Birmingham’s music is steeped in stark realism “I never really quit riding bulls,” he laughs. “The music just sort of took over. But, what you see is what you get when you deal with me, and that is how I want to come across through my music.”

TTRMS Performance: 2013, 2015, 2017

Top Songs: December Gone,’ ‘That’s What Dancers Do,’ ‘Best I Can,’ ‘What Was She Thinkin

The Texas Thunder Radio Music Showcase is a seasonal radio show, produced by Texas Thunder Radio, and hosted by Egon Barthels, from TKO’s Bar-Grill-Music in the Historic William Green Building at the corner of Avenue E (US90A) and 7th in Shiner, Texas. There is NO CHARGE and ALL AGES are welcome. Monetary tips to performing artist are welcomed and encouraged. With respect for artists on the TTRMS Radio Show, we kindly ask those in attendance to keep conversation noise down, during the show, which is from 8-9pm.

TTRMS April 17 Schedule

Texas Thunder Radio Music Showcase LIVE radio show airs Wednesdays at 8pm|CT on Texas Thunder Radio at 94.3 and 99.9FM , TexasThunderRadio.com, and Texas Thunder Radio on the TuneIn Radio App! Thank you for your support of Live Music!

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Hiker rescued after becoming trapped under 1,500-pound boulder

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By TJH

Twitter/@WestMetroFire(GOLDEN, Colo.) — A hiker in Colorado has been rescued after she was trapped beneath a 1,500-pound boulder in the Rocky Mountains, according to officials.

The 30-year-old woman was unconscious when firefighters pulled the boulder off her on North Table Mountain in Jefferson County, according to West Metro Fire Rescue. She suffered multiple fractures and was in critical condition when she was found by first responders, who worked quickly to stabilize and free her, according to the Golden Colorado Fire Department.

Crews trekked on foot and used an ATV to bring pieces of a hydraulic spreader, which was used together with airbags to remove the boulder, to the scene.

Several agencies assisted in the woman’s rescue.

Once the boulder was removed, fire officials described the woman’s vitals as “fairly good.” It is unclear how she became pinned under the boulder.

Video from ABC Denver affiliate KMGH shows of a team of rescuers hiking up the mountain’s steep terrain to bring the woman to a medical helicopter.

The hike took 45 minutes, the Golden Colorado Fire Department said. Rescuers used a rope system to bring her to the waiting chopper.

The hiker was then airlifted to a local hospital for medical attention, fire officials said.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Source:: National News

      

Texas Senate News for April 5

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By jcht2010

BILLS TAKE AIM AT LICENSE POINTS PROGRAM
A controversial program that fines Texas drivers would face major reforms or even total elimination under two bills considered at Wednesday’s Senate Transportation Committee. The Driver Responsibility Program was created in 2003 as a way to cover part of a budget shortfall that year, but critics say it’s putting a massive financial burden on Texas drivers. The program assigns “points” to drivers based on the number of traffic violations, which stay with the driver for two to three years, depending on the severity of the offense. These points accumulate with additional violations and once a person has six points, they have to pay a yearly $100 surcharge, and $25 more for every point above that. It also assesses surcharges upon conviction of some offenses, like an extra $250 fine in the case of a conviction for driving without insurance. “Paying these surcharges along with the litany of other costs can become an impossible task,” said Edgewood Senator Bob Hall, who cited figures stating that 1.2 million Texans have had their license suspended because they can’t pay the program’s fines.
Though the project is widely derided by the public and elected officials, it provides millions of dollars to support trauma care in the state, $55 million in 2015 alone. The committee considered a proposal to eliminate it entirely, SB 90 by Hall, who says the state needs to find a better way to pay for trauma care. “There is never a right reason to do the wrong thing,” he said. “Let’s end this program and find a sustainable funding stream for trauma care elsewhere.” Senator Kirk Watson offered a compromise bill, SB 266. His bill would cut in half the fines associated with the program and require that all the revenue earned from the program go into trauma care. “It’s just an effort to come to some sort of balance on a bad program,” he said. Both bills remain pending.
Also Wednesday, the Transportation Committee heard and passed a series of bills that would put restrictions on a high speed rail project being proposed in the state. A private company is currently planning a privately-funded high speed rail route between Dallas and Houston, but members representing areas in the planned route have serious concerns about the project. They point to a similar project in California they say has vastly overrun projected costs and worry that the state will be on the hook if the project fails. “Many of my constituents are concerned that if the private entity fails in its ambitious undertaking, taxpayers would be left with an incomplete or failed high speed rail project potentially requiring an infusion of state dollars to be either complete the project or return the land to its original condition,” said Georgetown Senator Charles Schwertner, whose Senate District 5 spans part of the possible high speed rail route.
Schwertner offered a suite of bills intended to protect taxpayers from supporting or bailing out the project should it fail. One, SB 977, prohibits the use of state funds to support the project other than as required under current law. Another, SB 979, would require any land taken through eminent domain for high speed rail be used for high speed rail or offered back to the land owner. A third, SB 980, would say that if the state does have to bail out the project, then the state becomes the primary creditor and must be paid back before anyone else.
Senator Lois Kolkhorst of Brenham proposed a bill, SB 981, to require the project to be usable by multiple types of train engine. She says the current proposal will only work with one kind of train and one kind of rail, and would create a monopoly for the operator. Finally, Senator Brian Birdwell put forward a bill that would require a company operating a high speed rail project to ensure a high level of safety and security for passengers and communities on the route and reimburse communities for the use of police officers for any security purposes.
The Senate will reconvene Thursday, April 6 at 10 am.
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Source:: jacksonconews.com

      

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David Letterman to induct Pearl Jam into Rock Hall, filling in for a sick Neil Young

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By Stephen Iervolino

Courtesy of Rock & Roll Hall of Fame(NEW YORK) — Neil Young has dropped out of inducting Pearl Jam into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame at this week’s induction ceremony. According to a tweet from the Rock Hall, David Letterman will step in for Young, who’s sick.

“Due to illness, Neil Young is sadly unable to induct @PearlJam [at] this year’s ceremony,” the tweet reads. “We’re thrilled David Letterman has agreed to step in.”

Frontman Eddie Vedder performed Pearl Jam’s 1994 hit “Better Man” during Letterman’s final week as host of The Late Show.

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be held Friday, April 7 in Brooklyn, New York. An HBO special focusing on the event will premiere Saturday, April 29, at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Source:: Entertainment News

      

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2017 Hall of Fame Inductee Alan Jackson: "I thought they [were] gonna drop me from the label!"

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By Music News Group

ABC/Image Group LABy the time the rest of the world found out that Alan Jackson would be going into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2017, the legend himself was already struggling to get used to the idea. But when he first got the news, he admits he was prepared for something that wasn’t exactly positive.

“Yeah, they snuck up on me man,” he recalls. “They called this fake meetin’ here at the record label and I thought they [were] gonna drop me off the label or something, you know?”

“And instead, [CMA CEO] Sarah [Trahern] walks in and announces what was going on, and kinda caught me off guard there,” he adds. “I didn’t know what to say.”

Alan feels that joining the Country Music Hall of Fame’s legendary ranks is simply the pinnacle of his career.

“This is just about the last dream on the list here! You know, this is the mountain top for a country singer,” he reflects.

Now, Alan can turn his attention to deciding which Country Music Hall of Famer he’d like to induct him at this year’s Medallion Ceremony, which is set to take place in October.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Source:: Country Music News

      

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